Popsicle Bridge #2

By on June 11, 2007 -- Modified on October 5, 2016

This popsicle bridge was made from 58 unmodified popsicle sticks. It was 25 inches long, 4 inches tall, and 3 inches wide. I used only Elmer’s white glue to build the bridge. It weighed 86.5 grams, and held 45 pounds. Its efficiency score was 248.

Build This Bridge

I redesigned this bridge from the earlier version. The new one is more efficient. It is also easier to build. I changed the position of only a couple popsicle sticks, and actually took off a few. I found that the average popsicle stick weighed 1.49 grams.

Stronger Version

This bridge uses the same basic design as the one above but doubles the number popsicle sticks in strategic places.

This popsicle bridge was made from 84 unmodified popsicle sticks. It spanned 24 inches, was 4 inches tall and 3 inches wide. I used only Elmer’s white glue to build the bridge. It weighed 118 grams, and held 115 pounds. Its efficiency score was 442.

This bridge is slightly crooked, even though you cannot tell it from this photo. I’m sure that had an affect on its performance. However, this bridge was also tested 5 times. Both my sisters stood on it, and one twice before this picture was taken.

I thought I was making a movie when I tested the bridge, but found out afterward that I hadn’t started the camera. Oh well, maybe next time.

None of the popsicle sticks actually broke. Only the joints failed. This is something for me to keep in mind, as it should be very easy to make this bridge a lot stronger.

Get plans for this bridge

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44 thoughts on “Popsicle Bridge #2”

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  1.   I tried doing that, but I tried gluing seprate triangles together. I’l see how it turns out 

    By JCPenny -- May 21, 2011
  2. this really helped me in my project for school

    By chance -- January 19, 2011
  3. -great job. This helped me put a lot while doing my science project.

    By shantel -- November 22, 2010
  4. Hey great job 🙂 its going to help me a lot in my project for physics.

    By Jenny -- May 22, 2010
  5. I am doing this as a project in my classroom, what kind of scale would you suggest I use to test how much the bridges can hold?

    By Monica -- October 25, 2009
    • Monica, I suggest using an analog bathroom scale.

      By Garrett Boon -- October 25, 2009
  6. hmm pls give the side pictures of the bridge so that I have a good lok at it…
    thank you for the advices and pictures it will help me a lot…

    By Jan Cedrick -- August 21, 2009
  7. Wonderful! Can you give me the process of making a bridge especially the connection and distribution of loads. Big thanks.

    By mckuen -- May 17, 2009
  8. Suggestion to the builder of the bridges: The joints failed, and it appears that they could use a vertical stick on each side of them to brace the sticks, an x-shape the way the glue holds and the way it works will have each stick of the x slide a different direction.
    brace the joints by gluing vertical and horizontal bars to each side.

    By Kat -- May 14, 2009
  9. Hey do you have any more side pictures of this bridge?? because i can’t see the middle very well…

    By Gato -- May 13, 2009
  10. Very well done, im doing a similar thing and was wandering what type of glue did you use?

    By Rene -- May 9, 2009
    • Rene, I think I used Elmer’s white glue for this bridge. It isn’t my favorite glue, but I wanted to the most common glue that other people would probably be using.

      By Garrett Boon -- May 11, 2009
    • im not sure wat glue they used but i can recommend the ad tech multi temp glue gun glue much better than glue sticks/glue bottles,tacky glue and all that other stuff if any to tell u the truth is really good glue and if u get it on u u only fell a slit sting of heat but it dont burn ur skin or nuthin like that

      By t wds -- January 5, 2010
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