Pony Truss

Today I found out what exactly a pony truss is. I had heard the term before, but never understood what it meant. In fact, it is quite simple. A pony truss is a truss bridge which allows traffic through the truss, but the top of the bridge is not joined together with cross braces.

Example of a real pony truss bridge:

whoopingcreek2b1

Any truss bridge can be a pony truss. But not many are being made anymore, so chances are small that you will actually see one.

10 thoughts on “Pony Truss”

  1. Hi Guys,

    I read this comments because I wanted to know what ‘pony’ means. Now I know that they are not braced at the top. In Route 66 there are still some Pony bridges. Like the one in Bridgeport coming from the 284 to 66 over the Southern Canadian river. This bridge is quit long, 3/4 mile (!) and contains 38 pont trusses.

    Reply
    • I am not sure what they mean by “lost” if the bridge is still there and in use. Perhaps it refers to the condition of the bridge and it might be replaced soon. You can try to find more information about that specific bridge at this historic bridge website:
      http://bridgehunter.com/

      Reply
      • It has found a home to a man in Walla Walla, Wa. It’s going to continue to be a functional bridge across a private creek there. But what a project that will be. It’s been cut up a bit for transport and will have to be lead abated, paint chipped off, repainted, cut parts reassembled, bureaucratic hurdles over there, etc. I can’t imagine. And Walla Walla is clear on the other side of the state. He almost didn’t find a transport company that would touch it.

        I’m a local and have crossed that bridge many times but for the last couple of years, it’s been replaced by a temporary Bailey bridge, one-way.

        New bridge is now finished and is nice, though. They’ve been worried about the old Pony bridge for some time.

        Reply
  2. Actually, Pony truss bridges are still being made and build, just most of them are secondary road that most do not travel. It also depends in the climate and what state you at in, and of course, your state’s designer.

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