Howe Truss Loaded

Learn all the main types of trusses used in real bridges, and see how to apply them to model bridges. Learn the history of each common truss design. This page is designed to help you make an educated decision about what truss design you should use on your bridge.

Truss Design

Learn all the main types of trusses used in real bridges, and see how to apply them to model bridges. Learn the history of each common truss design. This page is designed to help you make an educated decision about what truss design you should use on your bridge.

Common trusses used in engineering:

Warren Truss

Warren Truss

Warren Truss


The Warren truss is one of the most simple yet strong designs.  This simple design already existed, but what made the Warren unique is that it uses equilateral triangles. Each side of the triangles are the same length. This marked an improvement over the older Neville truss which did not use equilateral triangles.

Go to a more in depth analysis of the Warren Truss.

Pratt And Howe Truss


The Pratt and Howe trusses are very similar. In fact, the only difference is the direction the slanted members are angled. This changes which members are in compression and tension. On the Pratt truss, the shorter, vertical members are in compression. However, on the Howe truss, the longer, angled members are in compression. Because most materials (especially wood) that model bridge builders use decrease in the ability to resist compression the longer they are, I think the Pratt truss has an advantage.

There are more factors to consider, however. The Pratt and Howe trusses also differ in how they spread the load to the top and bottom chords. The Pratt truss has larger forces on the top and bottom chords than the Howe. Thus. you’d have to use bigger top and bottom chords.

Go to a more in depth analysis of the Pratt Truss.

Go to a more in depth analysis of the Howe Truss.

K Truss

K Truss

K Truss


The K truss looks very good on paper. It shortens the lengths of the compression members compared to the other trusses. However, one must wonder if it adds additional weight simply because of the number of members. It is really interesting to note the two green members on the K truss, in theory those pieces could be taken off. However, I had to include them to make the truss design program work. This shows only one orientation of the K truss. If I reversed the direction of the K’s, I wonder how much it would change the forces.

Go to a more in depth analysis of the K Truss.

The one thing I don’t like about this truss is the long vertical compression member in the middle of the bridge. If that one member could be shortened or even eliminated, I think the bridge would become more efficient.The K truss would be the hardest of these trusses to build. This is something worth considering. Making a strong joint that would make the most of the switch between compression and tension of the vertical members would be difficult.

If you are interested in learning more about trusses and truss design, check out Truss Fun, Second Edition from amazon. It can be purchased online though amazon. This is a comprehensive study on the engineering principles behind the design of bridges. It is easy to understand and to follow, and is a great fit for students who are just learning, but advanced enough to be a great resource to those with more experience. For more great resources, see this list of other great bridge books.

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166 Responses to “Truss Design”

  1. Estelle - February 24, 2015 at 10:20 pm

    Hey can you please give me more information on this Balsa Tower Design thing cause I need it for tomorrow and the prize is so aawesome if my group wins!!!! 🙂 Please Help!!!

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